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Tu 5 Dec 2006
20.30
premiere
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
We 6 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Su 10 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Mo 11 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Su 17 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Tu 26 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
We 27 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Fr 29 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Sa 30 Dec 2006
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Su 14 Jan 2007
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Su 21 Jan 2007
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Sa 27 Jan 2007
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

info@stan.be
Su 28 Jan 2007
20.30
Antwerp
tg STAN

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The first part of the Troy trilogy came into being when the Dutch writer/director, Koos Terpstra wanted to stage Andromache by Euripides. He decided to adapt this tragedy. In 1988, this adaptation became an independent play and was staged by the Toneelschuur from Haarlem.

With her enormous will to live, Andromache held Terpstra's interest. With Neoptolemos , the second part of the trilogy, the writer focuses on another episode of her life: the first months after the fall of Troy. For this prototype of victim of the first heroic war in world literature, the war is not over. It will linger on in her plans for revenge and in the hatred she feels for her master Neoptolemos. He is tired of fighting and looks for a solution, a compromise between deadly enemies. Terpstra's Neoptolemos was staged in 1991 and edited by Fact Rotterdam.

The third part of the trilogy, Troy , was written in the summer of 1994. This part plays in the year before the fall of Troy and treats the question of guilt emanating from an outwardly innocent woman's perspective.

In the Troy Trilogy , a forgotten war story is written: one of a woman in a non-passive role, as survivor, as victim. The Troy Trilogy is a rewriting from the perspective of the individual.

Mythological background of the characters:

Andromache is the daughter of Aëtion, the king of Cilical Thebe. She marries Hector. In the Trojan war, her father, seven brothers and her husband are killed, all by the hand of Achilles. After the fall of Troy, her five-year-old son, Astyanax, is killed and she herself is taken as war booty by Achilles' son Neoptolemos. She becomes his slave and lover and has with him her second son Molossus (in another tale they have three sons together). After the death of Neoptolemos she marries Helenos, a brother of Hector and twin brother of Cassandra. Together they rule over the Greek Epiros.

Neoptolemos is the only son of Achilles. After the death of his father, he goes to war. He does his utmost to be worthy of his father. From Odysseus he has received the armour of Achilles. He is one of the soldiers that are locked into the Trojan Horse what leads finally to the Greek victory over Troy. After the fall of Troy, he throws Hector and Andromache's son, Astyanax, down from the walls of Troy. At the division of the war booty he receives Hectors widow, Andromache. As concerns his adventures, the stories told differ somewhat. Most writers claim that he settles in Epiros or in the land of his father, Phthia, and that Menelaos gives him his daughter Hermione as wife, notwithstanding the fact that she is already engaged to Orestes. The marriage remaines barren, in contrast to the relation of Neoptolemos with Andromache. Whilst Neoptolemos, at a certain time, is on a trip to the sanctuary of Delphi, Hermione tries to get rid of her rival, but her plans are crossed by the old Peleus, grandfather of Neoptolemos. Orestes, however, comes to the rescue of his former fiancée: he kills Neoptolemos in Delphi and takes Hermione away with him.

tg STAN speelt "Neoptolemus"

The upshot of neoptolemos is a plea to see humanism as the only solution for irreconcilable differences which incite revenge. Seated at small tables spread out over the stage, the audience is instigated personally with the result that it comes away from the play in silence. Neoptolemos is more about human conflicts here, i.e. situations something can be done about, than it is about Iraq or Lebanon. The last thing the play does is deny the complexity of those conflicts. But the very last thing it does is admit total defeat. It glimmers with hope. It is the sort of theatre there is all too little of: theatre that shares a script rich in discussion material with the man in the street by presenting it clearly through image and acting. Expect no frills but highly relevant content, about a nearby and distant world which we laxly allow to take its course. 
A crucial production , De Morgen, Wouter Hillaert, 20/12/06 

Seated at small tables the audience witnesses a psychological dilemma in which the tide constantly turns. Although Artemis has prophesied that Neoptolemos will be murdered by Andromache, Neoptolemos seeks reconciliation. Or how Troy should not be a Palestine, Northern Ireland or Iraq. For STAN the New Year gets off to a promising start. The subdued acting style of Kruyver and Vercruyssen is well suited to Koos Terpstra's sober script. Neither of the two says a word too many; every swipe seeks and finds its target. It is a compact, powerful play about a highly topical theme. Stripped of all the ballast and bombast, neoptolemos is majestic in its simplicity. Though sharp as a knife, it also heals with the promise of hope.
The end of right , Knack, Thijs De Smet, 10/01/07

text Koos Terpstra
a performance by and with Minke Kruyver and Frank Vercruyssen

advice costumes An D'Huys
lighting design Raf De Clercq and Tim Wouters
set design tg STAN
with the participation of Jolente De Keersmaeker

production tg Stan

premiere 5 December 2006, rehearsal space tg STAN, Antwerp